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Scotch Whisky

8 Item(s)

  • Kilchoman 2008 Vintage 46% 70cl
    This is the First 7 year old malt released by the distillery which was established in 2005. This was distilled in 2008 and matured in bourbon barrels before bottling in 2005. It has a powerful nose of peat smoke, spice, dark chocolate and citrus notes. The palate is wonderfully balanced with peat...
    £67.25
  • Balmenach 2008 Connoisseurs Choice 46% 70cl
    Balmenach was one of the first stills to become legitimate back in 1823 after the licensing act. This bottling has been matured in a refill sherry butt and a refill Bourbon barrel. Suntle sherry flavours with vanilla from the bourbon wood. The palate is peppery with sweet banana and orange and mi...
    £42.50
  • Bruichladdich Bere Barley 2008 Dunlossit Estate 50% 70cl
    This is Bruichladdich latest release of Bere Barley farmed at the Dunlossit estate on the Isle of Islay. The barley which is one of the oldest strains in Britain was harvested in 2007 and distilled in 2008,  a single vintage expression. The resulting whisky has been aged in ex-Americ...
    £73.99
  • Coopers Choice Ardmore 2008 Port Cask 46% 70cl
    Distilled in 2008 at the Ardmore Distillery and bottled by The Vintage Malt Whisky Co. Limited to 1 of only 420 bottles. A Highland single malt, distilled in July 2008 and bottled in 2017, matured in American Oak with additional aging in a port wine pipe, Cask No. 823. Over 8 years old...
    £60.50
  • Coopers Choice Tobermory 2008 Marsala Cask 56.5% 70cl
    An Island single malt, distilled August 2008 and bottled in 2018. Matured in American Oak with additional aging in a Marsala Cask, Cask No 6669. Over 9 years old, only 1 of 325 bottles produced. The cooper's Choice range of single cask whiskies from Scotlands finest distilleries is or ...
    £79.50
  • Bunnahabhain 2008 Moine Bordeaux Red Wine cask Matured 2008
    Despite the original non-peated Islay malt, Bunnahabhain becoming well known for its Mòine, (means ‘peated’ in Scots Gaelic) variants in recent years. For the first time in the distillery's history, this peated spirit has been fully matured in premium red wine casks from Bordeaux in ...
    £135.00
  • Deanston 2008 9 years old Bordeaux Red Wine Cask Matured 58.7% 70cl
    Deanston 2008 is a Highland single malt whisky that has been simply aged in casks that previously held Bordeaux red wine. It's bottled at cask strength which is always a bonus in our opinion. The nose is sweet with toffee and honey but also with spices and citrus. The palate allows the effects of...
    £55.50
  • Glen Scotia 2008 Ruby Port Finish 57.8% 70cl
    This bottling is a limited edition. Glen Scotia's Malt Master selected casks of pelted single malt exclusively matured in first fill bourbon barrels delivering the subtly smoky and maritime character of Glen Scotia with a long finish of soft medicinal peat and dry saltiness. These casks are th...
    £49.00

Scotch whisky is a subject that is as expansive as the myriad of lochs, glens and mountains that contribute to the terroir of its historic homeland of Scotland. Scottish whisky in its current form has been distilled in the Highlands and Lowlands since the 18th Century but its roots run much deeper into the past. It is widely regarded that it is an adaptation of the traditional Scottish spirit ‘Uisge Beatha’, meaning ‘water of life’ in the Celtic tongue. The earliest official record of its production is in 1494 but it is highly likely that it was produced prior to this date. It’s a widely held belief that Irish monks introduced the spirit to the Scots although no true Scotsman would ever admit to this!


This precious liquid’s heritage is protected by law so that only spirit distilled within Scottish borders can be labelled as Scotch. There are other caveats as well; it must be made from either malted barley or grain fermented in copper stills and matured in wooden Oak barrels. This batch process is essential to the authenticity of the spirit, as is the insistence that it is bottled at 40% ABV or higher.


There are four different varieties of Scotch; single malt, blended, grain and blended malt (which was formerly known as vatted malt). Single malt is defined as a whisky made from 100% malt barley by one distillery. This is by far the most valuable and collected variety, especially rare bottlings from closed distilleries that can fetch four figure plus sums. Blended whisky is a spirit that’s created using a mixture of malt and grain whiskies by one distillery. This is the most popular and widely drunk variety despite the single malt’s continued rising popularity, driving up both production and price significantly. Grain whisky, as the name suggests, is made from 100% grain by a single distillery. Finally, blended malt is a product that is created by combining two or more single malts from separate distilleries together without the addition of grain whisky.


Despite only a few simple ingredients being used in the production process (malted barley or grain, water and yeast), a surprising array of different characteristics can be achieved. Gentle drams from the Lowlands can be soothing, light and fruity whilst big, bold offerings from Islay can knock your socks off with an assault of peat and smokiness. There are many variations in between to explore and it takes dedication and a whole lot of tasting to become a true whisky connoisseur!


The type of barrel used to mature the whisky accounts for the lions share of the final flavour. Factors such as whether American Oak or European Oak have been used to make the barrels, how many times the barrels have been used previously to mature Scotch or other drinks like Bourbon, Port or Sherry and the length of time the spirit has spent maturing all play their part. In more recent times, some distilleries have gone rogue by experimenting with old cognac, wine and rum casks, thus creating a modern and youthful taste that appeals to the trendy bar fraternity.


There are six distinct whisky producing regions in Scotland and they also have some bearing on the flavour of the final product. The regions are Islay, Islands, Highlands, Lowlands, Speyside and Campbeltown. The terrain, climate and other geographical factors of a region all contribute to the character, although a great deal also has to do with the different techniques and traditions employed by the distilleries as well. A good example is how coastal distilleries often produce a whisky that is saltier due to the proximity of the sea.


The world of Scotch whisky is a complex and fascinating one that thrives on time honoured practices and ancient traditions. If you are thinking of taking your first foray into this exciting realm, whether for pleasure or investment, then we are on hand to offer our expert advice and a selection of over 1000 different whiskies to suit all budgets.